6/6/2012 – Catching up again

June 6.  Unless I misremember, today is D-Day.  Just showing off how good my memory is.  Sometimes.

Anyway, I was reminded by my mother yesterday that it had been awhile since I last posted anything.  And so it has.  You might think that means we haven’t been doing anything and you’d be almost right.  We have been doing stuff but none of it seemed quite enough for a blog entry all by itself.  So, instead, I’ll try to catch you up since the last blog.

I recently sent an e-mail to Latitude 38 magazine telling them about our stay here in Puerto Peñasco.  They seem to like that sort of thing and I figured it was something for their “Changes in Latitudes” column.  Got a nice e-mail back from the publisher asking for a photo of Lulu and I so maybe he’s plannng on using the article.

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Lulu and me at the Boo Bar

I’m going to start watching for it in next month’s issue.  BTW, in case you didn’t know, you can download full issues of Lat38 for free.

One thing that I sort of forgot to mention in that article is the problem of electrolysis in the harbor.  The harbor is “hot”.  Because of stray voltage running through the water, sacrificial zincs are eaten up at an alarming rate.  And, once your zincs are gone, your prop could be next.  We know of one couple who completely lost the prop on their bow thruster to electrolysis.  Although our zincs were only about 50% gone when we arrived, I opted to get a big hurkin’ weld-on style zinc, connect it electrically it to our prop shaft and Frigoboat keel cooler and then hang it over the side.  Lots of zinc to sacrifice there and believe me, it’s visibly eroding already.

I previously mentioned the tides as one of the reasons cruisers and cruising guides give for not coming here.  The other day, during the full moon, I got some pretty good shots of the difference in the harbor during a 20+ foot tidal swing.

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Baja Adventure at high tide

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Baja Adventure at low tide

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Fuel dock at high tide

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Fuel dock at low tide

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From the top of the ramp at high tide

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From the top of the ramp at low tide (not a good time to move batteries from the boat to your car)

What a difference 7 hours makes, eh?

We took our friends Mark & Barb out to eat last week and they’re taking us out tonight.  Mark’s also going to give us a ride out to the Circus Mexicus festivities that start Friday.

We spent last night at our friends Bill & Elli’s condo outside of town, right along the beach at Playa Encantado.  I know the genders don’t match but that’s what the sign says.

Bill and Elli

Nice to get off the boat once in awhile.  Just can’t get over how many nice folks we’ve met here in Puerto Peñasco in the short time we’ve been here.

On the boat maintenance front:

The antifreeze leak is pretty well repaired although I noticed a little bit of seepage.  That’s probably because I only wrapped the Rescue Tape an inch or so beyond the hole whereas the instructions call for 4-5 inches.  But, since a slight seep is way better than the open hole we had before and the hole didn’t cause us any problems, I’ll probably just let it go until I replace all the hoses this summer.

I finally installed an electric fuel pump on the engine’s oil drain line.  I’ve meant to do that after EVERY oil change but never seemed to get around to it.  After running the engine long enough  to reach operating temperature and thus, thin the oil, I shut the engine down, put the discharge hose from the pump into an empty oil jug and turned the pump on.  A few minutes later, the old oil was out without the usual mess intermingled with my loud cussing.  Much as I’ve railed against the Westerbeke engineers in the past for some of their boneheaded placement of hoses, I have to give them credit here.  I had assumed that a previous owner had connected the hose from the drain plug on the engine’s oil pan but apparently, looking at my parts manual, it’s a Westerbeke feature.  This made connecting a pump pretty much a piece of cake.  As a bonus, when I bought this fuel pump, I noticed that it was an exact match for the fuel pump on the engine.  So, I went back to the store and bought another to have on hand as a spare.

Fuel pump as oil drain pump

 

Okay, that’s about it for us for now.  The concert festivities start Friday and run more or less through Sunday.

Oh wait, I have to include a photo of one of the coolest malecón statues we’ve seen yet.  This one is dedicated to the shrimping industry in Puerto Peñasco.  Wish the photo was a little clearer.

Hi-O Pinkie, Away!

 

¡Adiós, amigos!

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About sryoder

Steve & Lulu... retired. Had enough of the cold wet dreary fall/winter/spring in the Pacific Northwest. Bought a boat, fixed it up, sold our home and sailed to Mexico in November, 2010. Been here ever since except for occasional forays to the States (summer only, thank you) to visit the kids, parents and siblings. If you're looking for a sailing blog, this is the wrong place. This is a traveling, hunkering in, eating blog. Sailing is just how we get from place to place when we can't walk.
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8 Responses to 6/6/2012 – Catching up again

  1. Thanks for the update, I missed reading your posts! You and Lulu look fantastic. Hope you are eating well. :)

    • sryoder says:

      Thanks for missing us. Oh yeah. We’re eating real well. Lulu made chilaquiles the other night that were great. Last night Bill made the best meatloaf ever and he cooked it in a solar oven. He maintains that the meatloaf was just so-so and says he can do much better. We can’t wait to find out. Carne asada and grilled chicken tacos a couple nights ago, burgers at the Boo Bar, excellent gyros at the new Greek place in town, El Greco. I had a fish filet with some kind of REALLY good garlicky sauce along with grilled vegetables and Lulu had what she described as “perfect” batter-fried chicken breasts when we went out with Mark & Barb to Seor Amigo’s. No telling what we’ll eat tonight at La Curva. So, yeah, we’re eating quite well.

      -Steve

  2. Joan/Raymond Yoder says:

    Good to hear from you again, and what great pictures. Love, Mom

  3. MWhite:LittleCunningPlan says:

    That’s either a mighty big shrimp, or a mighty shrimpy man. But those tides are nothing but incredible. Pictures are definitely the only way to express that. Sounds like you two are having a grand time!

  4. Beverly says:

    Those tides are the most incredible thing I have ever seen!! Thanks for the pictures. And the one of the two of you is great.

  5. Don says:

    My high school basketball coach took us to fish near Puerto Peñasco in 1960. The trip kindled a love for Baja that draws me back over and over again. We camped on the shore above high tide and would walk and fish our way across the flats following the ebbing tide then retreat back toward shore when the flood began. Once we walked almost a mile out and back, along oyster lined channels. We caught very large totuava, a white sea bass. Totuava were fished to near extinction and in 1979 declared endangered. They have made a bit of a recovery in Mexico’s first marine reserve between Puerto Peñasco and Felipe, which was commissioned in the early 1990′s. Commercial fishermen are prohibited from catching totuava.

  6. Tate says:

    Steve,

    Let us know if the article gets published. I’d like to read it. If not, can you post it to your blog? Or maybe it is your blog already.

    Tides look awesome. Nothing like that here or anywhere I’ve been so far.

    • sryoder says:

      Will do. “Article” might be a bit of an overstatement as it was basically a short e-mail about Puerto Peasco. If it’s published it’ll probably be in the “Changes In Latitudes” section of the magazine. But, Tate, if you’re not already reading Latitude 38, you really should get started. As I said above, you can download entire issue for free. Although San Francisco based publication, they cover Mexico and the Caribbean at least as much as they cover the Bay area.

      And, yes, the tides are pretty awesome. Puget Sound gets similar swings although not quite as dramatic as this. Of course, up here, the incoming water has nowhere to go except up.

      -Steve

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