6/3/2013 – Photo Post: Isla San Francisco

After we left San Evaristo we sailed down to Isla San Francisco where we encountered the clearest water we’ve seen so far this season.

This is maybe 12-15 feet deep but we saw a turtle swimming along the bottom in 25' of water as we entered the harbor.

This is maybe 12-15 feet deep but we saw a turtle swimming along the bottom in 25′ of water as we entered the harbor.

The water was so clear that we could easily see the anchor down 15'.  The half circle you see is the "roll bar" on the back of the anchor which makes sure that it doesn't remain upside down for long, even if the weighted point doesn't happen to do the job.  The stock on the anchor is pointed towards the SW corner of the photo más ó menos.

The water was so clear that we could easily see the anchor down 15′. The half circle you see is the “roll bar” on the back of the anchor which makes sure that it doesn’t remain upside down for long, even if the weighted point doesn’t happen to do the job. The stock on the anchor is pointed towards the SW corner of the photo más ó menos.

Anchored behind the hook for protection from the southerly swells.  It's amazing how different the ride was between here and where we had been the night before in the more exposed area.

Anchored behind the hook for protection from the southerly swells. It’s amazing how different the ride was between here and where we had been the night before in the more exposed area.

And, for perspective, here’s the Google Earth shot of the west anchorage on Isla San Francisco:

Not nearly this many boats when we were there.

We were anchored just about where that boat to the right of the speedboat is.  Prior to that we had been anchored just about where the top photo icon is.

I walked the whole length of the beach one day and came across a number of interesting finds:

Dessicated remains of a Mobi ray.  These are the guys that look like miniature Manta rays.  They're the ones that I've commented on before that like to jump clear out of the water and flop back in.

Dessicated remains of a Mobi ray. These are the guys that look like miniature Manta rays. They’re the ones that I’ve commented on before that like to jump clear out of the water and flop back in.

A discarded turtle shell.  I doubt the previous tenant discarded it voluntarily.

A discarded turtle shell. I doubt the previous tenant discarded it voluntarily.  This thing was about 24″ long by around 18″ wide at the widest point.

I'm not sure what kind of fish this used to be.

I’m not sure what kind of fish this used to be.

And I really don’t know what this was, nor would I want to happen upon him in the water:

Big Moray eel? Barracuda? Yo no se.

Big Moray eel? Barracuda? Yo no se.

And, lest you think that all I photograph is corpses, here’s a live Oyster Catcher for you.

oyster catcher

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About sryoder

Steve & Lulu... retired. Had enough of the cold wet dreary fall/winter/spring in the Pacific Northwest. Bought a boat, fixed it up, sold our home and sailed to Mexico in November, 2010. Been here ever since except for occasional forays to the States (summer only, thank you) to visit the kids, parents and siblings. If you're looking for a sailing blog, this is the wrong place. This is a traveling, hunkering in, eating blog. Sailing is just how we get from place to place when we can't walk.
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One Response to 6/3/2013 – Photo Post: Isla San Francisco

  1. ‘really enjoying all the pics! (hmm… maybe not the pointed tooth corpse. I still want to enjoy swimming)
    Keep ’em coming

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